Book production, Self Publishing

August 2nd is National Coloring Book Day!

Coloring books have become a big category in the publishing industry, with adult coloring leading the trend. Even those of us who are less artistically inclined can find relaxation, creativity, and fun in the pages of a coloring book.

We print coloring books for a variety of customers. As you can see, plastic spiral binding is a popular choice because of its ability to truly lay flat. Jamie David, Hawaii-based author of the early reader novel, Johann Sebastian Humpbach, created a companion coloring book (example page on the left).

Coloring Books

Gigi Murfitt is a writer, speaker, and mentor who has developed a series of journals to help people going through tough times. She incorporated coloring book pages into her journals and devotionals. Great idea, Gigi!

Do you have a coloring book project you’ve been planning? Come to us for multiple binding options (we can perfect bind your coloring book, too!) and high-quality paper that will hold your colors.

Just feel inspired to color inside the lines? Enjoy a few vintage book plates to get you going.

Learn more about Coloring Book Day here:

And don’t forget to call us if you’re planning your own coloring book!


Book production, Cost, Links, Local authors, Marketing, Self Publishing, Social Media

Need to pay for your book project? Try crowdfunding!

We’ve seen many authors and artists come through our shop who have used a crowdfunding website to fund the cost of publishing their books. What is a crowdfunding website? It’s a website that exists as a platform to help people who have an idea, but need dollars to make the idea a reality. In our line of work, that idea is a book.

Listing your project on a crowdfunding website is also a great way to test the market’s interest in your book before it’s published. It will help you start thinking about the niche your book will fill. If you can successfully generate buzz for the concept of your book on a crowdfunding platform, there’s a good chance you’ll be able to enjoy some traction with your marketing efforts once the book is published.

The most commonly-used crowdfunding website is Kickstarter. Here is a link to their handbook to get you started, and a few tips to help along the way:

  • Backing others helps you learn the ropes and get a feel for the Kickstarter community.
  • Set up your payment options in advance so you are ready to accept funds on day one.
  • Be clear on discounts and perks – and get creative!
  • Aim high when setting your dollar amount, but not so high you can’t meet your goal and cash in.
  • Tell the story of your book, and consider making a video.
  • Answer all backer questions. They are supporting your efforts!
  • Use a simple analytics tracker to learn more about your readers.

Time to get inspired! Here are a few authors we know used Kickstarter to fund their book projects, then hired us to print them.

Bard_Hey Baby


Breena Bard, a Portland, Oregon-based cartoonist and graphic novelist released “Hey Baby,” a 6.5×8.5″ softcover, in summer 2016.

Breena’s Kickstarter








Margaret Davis, another Portland-based writer and book artist, funded “China Under the Covers” this past winter.

Margaret’s Kickstarter





Adobe Photoshop PDF



Olympia-based fungi enthusiast Ellen King Rice funded her novel “The Evo Angel” in 2015 for publication in spring 2016.

Ellen’s Kickstarter





Back in 2014, Peter Donahue funded a beautiful full-color, full-size landscape hardcover book complete with custom-printed end sheets and a matte-laminated dust jacket for the first volume of his popular “Rudek and the Bear” comic collection. As one of his Kickstarter pledge prizes, Peter drew any supporter who pledged $35 or more into the style of his characters and added it as a spread in the beginning of his book.


Peter’s Kickstarter

Peter’s ongoing web comic:

Test the waters for your book project! Try crowdfunding!

Book production, Events, Local authors, Marketing, Reading, Self Publishing, Writing

We Went to Wordstock!

This time last week, Genevieve and Alison were loading up boxes of guidebooks, tote bags, business cards, candy, and Genevieve’s trusty typewriter Buttercup to drive south for Wordstock, Portland’s recently-rebooted  festival of books and writing hosted by Literary Arts.

2-wordstock-boothThousands of writers and readers from around the region gathered at the Portland Art Museum last Saturday to attend workshops, hear readings from over 100 authors, and wander the booths at the book fair.

We talked to dozens and dozens of readers and writers, most of whom stepped up to our booth to browse our beautiful selection of sample books, and to pull a word from a fish tank to use in a sentence on Buttercup, the 1950s Royal typewriter that made the trek with us. Many of them took a copy of our free guidebook to learn more about the book printing process for themselves or a friend or family member working on a

As a short run book printer, we attended this  event not only to meet writers who might be interested in publishing their own work who might need a printer, but also to chat with the 25+ independent publishing companies who were there to meet writers and sell their books.

While many of these publishing companies are big enough to need quantities of books that warrant printing on offset presses, they may need Advance Reader Copies (ARCs) ahead of the run that will be sold in stores. Our digital printing methods mean we can keep costs low on a smaller run of books, and we can produce them on fairly short notice if a publisher finds themselves with a deadline an offset printer couldn’t hope to meet.

We had the great privilege of printing the ARCs of City of Weird, a fresh-released collection of short stories from Forest Avenue Press. This book was a Powell’s Pick of the Month in October! We also saw past clients at tables for Atelier26 Books as well as the Willamette Writers, who print their literary journal, The Timberline Review, with us. We made friends at booths for YesYes Books, Chin Music Press and Overcup Press.

All in all it was a day full of excellent conversation with fellow book-folk. We can’t wait for next year!


About Us, Book production, Self Publishing

How Long Does It Take to Print a Book?

This is one of the most commonly asked questions when a customer places an order for a book. While our standard production time for softcover books is 10-15 business days once your proofs are approved, there are many factors that can impact the time your project is in our shop.

How you submit your files and the binding style of your book are the major variables that impact turnaround times.Need-books-in-a-hurry

Print-Ready PDF Orders

The fastest way to get from file submission to printed books is to design your cover and interior and submit print-ready files. Once you’ve created an account and generated a quote to match your file specifications (trim size and page count, plus the quantity you’d like printed), you can finalize your order with a credit card for half of the estimated order total right through our website. Then you can use our file upload tool to submit your print-ready files.

Once we have your files, we check them for potential printing problems then prepare your proof. If your files meet all of our requirements and we can proceed right to proof prep, we’ll have your proof ready to go in 3-4 business days. If you opted for an online proof, you can download and review the proof immediately. If you upgraded to a printed proof, we’ll mail an unbound proof to you via USPS Priority (1-3 business day transit time for most locations).

Design Services

If you opt to hire Gorham Printing for design services, the time between file submission and proofing is a bit longer. Depending on the complexity of your design and the components you’re hiring us for, the process can take anywhere from 5 days (Assisted Cover Design only) to 2 weeks or more (Level 3 Interior Design plus a Custom Cover, for example). Once design is complete, you’ll receive your proof in the format you’ve selected on your order.

Production Times

Once you’ve given us permission to proceed to production by submitting a signed proof form, your order will enter the production queue. Production times vary by binding style and quantity.

Most softcover orders for quantities under 100 typically take 5 business days until they are ready to ship. Orders of 500-1000 typically take 10 business days. Orders over 1000 can take up to 15.

Spiral bound books take 15-20 business days until they are ready to ship. Hardcover books take 6-7 weeks.

What if I need my book sooner?

Give us a call! Our production times are standards based on our experience and typical volumes, but we may be able to coordinate a compressed production window for clients who have events fast approaching. Call us as soon as you know you need books for a specific date, and we will work backwards to determine the date we’ll need your final approval in order to guarantee a specific shipping or pick up deadline.

We do not charge extra for in-shop rushes, but you may need to pay for expedited UPS shipping if our present volumes will not allow for the turn around time your shipping deadline would require.