Category Archives: Community

National Encourage a Young Writer Day is April 10th!

The crew at Gorham Printing was excited to learn that Encourage a Young Writer Day is a thing, and it’s right around the corner! Monday April 10th is a day marked to let any young writer in your life know that they should keep up the good work.

We participate in and support many young writers and literacy projects in our community. Last year we sponsored a young writer contest in affiliation with the Roosevelt Elementary Read-a-Thon, and we’re doing it again this year. Last year Arianna’s The Girl Who Saved a Dinosaur was a hit in our shop. A winner has been chosen for this year and we can’t wait see his story (we’ve heard it’s about a ninja pig!).

Last spring we also sponsored the printing of the Olympia High School Literary Press anthology, Attic. This anthology showcases the talents of English classes at Olympia High School and pairs it with submissions from the art department. Students solicit and gather submissions, curate and edit the content, then design and promote their book.

A few of the local colleges hire us print anthologies and other projects, too. South Puget Sound Community College printed their annual literary anthology, The Percival Review, with us last spring. We print The Evergreen State College’s Vanishing Point anthology, too, along with collections of student work from various creative writing courses.

We even have one young author who published Small Stories, an adorable 5×5” collection. Hadley Stanfill’s mom Laura is the editor in chief at Forest Avenue Press and we take great pride in helping her encourage her daughter to write and publish!

Young Writers

Do you know a young writer? Whether they’re a college student studying creative writing in an undergraduate program or a third grader writing stories in their journal, let them know you support and admire their efforts as a growing artist.

And if you happen to know a young writer who has a story they want to turn into a book, let them know Gorham Printing is here to help!

 

 

 

 

Promoting Your Book at the Library

Are you looking for new ways to promote your book? Libraries are a great place to gain new readers and connect directly with your target audience.

Consider approaching your local library to set up a speaking engagement. If the library is interested in hosting your reading, they’ll likely put you on their event calendar so you can generate interest ahead of time. Ask if you can register the event on any other community event calendars, or with local special interest groups that might be interested in your topic.

The promotional tools an event like this can offer don’t stop there. The library might announce your reading on their social media pages, like Facebook and Twitter. Make sure to continue to share these event announcements, and encourage your friends and followers to share them too. The library might even have event posters printed, so ask if you can have a few to post around your community.ray_biko-frontcover-for-web

Many of our self-published authors give talks throughout their local library systems. In fact, we have a few regional authors with library events coming up!

The Naselle Timberland Library will host Laura Ray, author of Because of Biko, this Wednesday, March 1st at 6:00 PM. Laura will read from her book, which tells the story of her travels in Africa, and a discussion and book signing will follow.fateful-fourth-cover

On Saturday, March 4th, local author and historian Russell Holter will talk about his recently-published title, The Fateful Forth: The Story of America’s Worst Trolley Disaster at the Vernetta Smith Chehalis Timberland Library at 2:00 PM. A book sale and signing will follow. Russell’s book is part of our History Book Program, so you can order a copy online!

Author and Life Coach Anatha Attar will host a workshop title Tarot: A Path to Greater Personal Creativity at the Lacey Timberland Library on Saturday, March 4th at 3:00 PM. Anatha published her title Tarot and the Twelve Powers: A Journey for the Heart and Soul in summer 2016. You can learn more at her website.

Reach out to your local library system today to find out how you might be able to promote your book with their help!

An Evening with the Authors

Last Friday the Lewis County Historical Museum welcomed the public for its sixth annual Evening with the Authors. We had the privilege of attending this event and decked out our table to match the museum’s incredible Christmas Village and the rest of the festive decorations.

table-top

We took great pride in joining a good handful of our local authors at this event. While we love printing books for writers, families, and small presses all over the country, there is particular joy in supporting our local authors. This group of clients showcases the diversity of books we print. They represent novelists, historians, non-fiction and self-help writers.

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From left to right: Jan Pierson, author of the Ghostowners Series (calamityjan.com); Ellen King Rice with her novel, The Evo Angel, a mycological thriller set in the Pacific Northwest (ellenkingrice.com); Buddy Rose, author of Fire Mountains, a hiking guide to Washington’s three volcanoes; Margaret Chambers with her history of a rural Lewis County church, St. Urban’s Church: Early Years; Randall R. Booher and his personal development workbook, You Are the Issue, hot of the presses, along with his illustrator (and sister!), Leslie Gammelgaard; and Julie McDonald Zander with just two of her many local and personal history books, Winning a War and The Other Side of Banking (chaptersoflife.com).

We hope to see even more of our local authors here next year. Contact the museum for more information on how to participate.

Back to School at Gorham Printing

Leaves are changing, rain is falling, and we’re all padding our commute times to account for school bus backups on the country roads that lead to our shop. There is always plenty to do this time of year, especially because we are a popular option for educators who need textbooks.

We’ve been especially excited about a new partnership with the American College of Healthcare Sciences (ACHS) in Portland, Oregon. ACHS is a world-renowned holistic health institution whose “graduates include military veterans, product formulators, massage therapists, clinical aromatherapists, wellness coaches, midwives, master

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A stack of ACHS’s fall semester textbooks, hot off the presses!

herbalists, medical doctors, and nutritionists, to name a few.” They are a Certified B Corporation “with a commitment to supporting local business, sustainability and the communities [they] serve.”

ACHS chose us to be their book printer not only because we are a family-owned business within 100 miles of their campus, but because we offer Rainforest Alliance Certified stocks and recycle 100% of the byproduct from both our paper processing and our printer waste. Most of their textbooks have beautiful full-color interiors that really pop on our presses. Our standard stocks and lamination are exactly what they need for durable yet affordable textbooks for their students.

With runs as few as 25, we’re a great option if your textbooks contain material that needs to be updated annually or every term. If you are an educator or a representative of an academic institution with a need for custom-printed textbooks, let us quote your project!

To learn more about the American College of Healthcare Sciences, visit www.achs.edu.

An Interview with Roy I. Wilson

A retired ordained United Methodist clergyman and Cowlitz Tribal Elder, Roy Wilson has written more than 30 books, many printed by Gorham Printing. His role as a spiritual leader gives him a special insight into both Native and Western spirituality. His special-interest books encompass tribal history, language and Medicine Wheel wisdom. Roy has recently completed Bear Raven longhouse, a retreat and spiritual center for Native and non-Native people to join together and study Native American spiritual teachings.

We had the privilege of chatting with Roy in the shop one day when he stopped by to pick up an order of books.

Gorham Printing: When did you start writing about history?

Roy Wilson: I started writing history back in the early 1980s, thirty to forty years ago, when nobody had written a history on the Cowlitz tribe. I did what I call a simple ‘dateline history.’ It was a little booklet of only twenty-eight pages. It started off 1806 and then simply the statement, “Lewis and Clark land at the mouth of the Cowlitz river,” nothing more. Nothing about it. It was twenty-eight pages of just a date and a line of a few words.

That was my first start [writing history] but I was very busy at that time. I was still pastoring. I was on the Washington State Governor’s advisory council. I had two national offices in the Indian world. One year I made 62 cross country flights. It was a nightmare. I was living out of a suitcase. I didn’t have any time to write and so I’d just write little short things. I wrote a number of little booklets until I retired. I started taking those booklets and using them as a table of contents to write larger books. The twenty-eight page dateline history in the early 80s became a 243 page book on the history of the tribe in the 90s.

GP: How did you find Gorham Printing?

RW: It was a woman from up on Bainbridge Island who had followed my Indian teachings for a long time and she had a book printed by Gorham. And she had copies of my books and she sent me an email. She said I’m going to be down in Centralia in a few days to get my book that’s being printed. Sure would like to see you too! So I came up and met her here while she was getting her and books. Up until then I was having my books printed in Ohio. Prices were basically the same. The difference was shipping cost! I just pick up my books at Gorham now.DispossessedCover

GP: What are your thoughts on the purpose of preserving history, particularly in book form?

RW: Several different comments. One. History repeats itself. Quote-unquote. We are creating history with our actions today. Maybe we can do a better job of it if we study what’s happened in the past. History is important to create the dynamics of a powerful future.

The next thing is that we need to realize that history needs to be looked at from many different points of view. I recall an article that quoted, “There is no existing accurate historical record in existence.” Each writer has written history from their vantage point, their point of view.

I gave a lot of thought to that. It makes writing history more important because I need to look at the history of that event through as many different eyes as I can to come up with what might have really happened. The Indian history that’s taught in our schools and our universities is all written from the white man’s perspective. So it’s important for me to write it from an Indian’s point of view. What really happens when the Indian dies? There are several Indian historians now who’ve done this and I have copies of some of their works. It’s just a totally different story.

It’s important we see all the different views and then make up our own mind about what we think really happened.

 

To learn more about Roy Wilson’s work, or to order a copy of his book, visit his website: http://sundancemedicinewheel.com/