Community, Events, Local authors

Olympia High School Students Showcase Their Talent in 2019 Literary Journal

Sanctuary5
Cover design for Sanctuary. Artwork by Zoe Wiley.

In the early hours of Friday morning, students crowded the Olympia High School library to share pizza and celebrate the unveiling of the 2019 literary magazine, Sanctuary. Featuring over 100 pieces of original prose, poetry and artwork, Sanctuary celebrates the talent and craftsmanship of Olympia’s young artists.

The unveiling concludes the year-long efforts of the school’s student-led literary club. To accomplish their task, club members were divided into groups, each charged with a different facet of the publishing process, including fundraising, layout and design. This year’s editors faced the particularly difficult task of narrowing down over 500 submissions.

Club presidents Emily Hoppe and Maisy Maclay kicked off the event by inviting students to read excerpts from their work. Readers took turns in front of the room, showcasing the magazine’s electric range of subject matters and styles.

Sanctuary3
Student writer Haily O’Hara reads her submission to celebrate the unveiling.

“The name Sanctuary represents what we want the book to be for students,” said co-president Emily Hoppe. “We want the magazine to be a safe space for students to express themselves.”

The magazine not only serves as a creative outlet for students but also offers real-world industry experience. Several club members expressed hopes of applying the editing and design skills they learned while working on the magazine towards their portfolios and future careers.

“What makes this year’s magazine special is that I didn’t have to do anything,” said Carolyn Gilman, an OHS English teacher who serves as the magazine’s advisor. “The students really did everything, from editing to design to judging the submissions.”

Sanctuary4
This year’s magazine was the first to feature full-color artwork. Artwork by Maggie Koontz.

Local book printer, Gorham Printing, helped sponsor the publication by donating 100 free copies towards the magazine’s 250 print run. As part of the publication process, students were invited to tour Gorham Printing’s print shop to learn more about the equipment and procedures used to print the magazine.

Free copies of Sanctuary were distributed to students who had their work featured in the magazine. Additional copies are set to go on sale for $10 at local bookstores and the school’s annual craft fair. Those interested in purchasing a copy can also do so via email by contacting: olyliterarymagazine@gmail.com.

Sanctuary1
From left: Club advisor Carolyn Gilman. Editors in Chief Emily Hoppe and Maisie Maclay. Interior Designer Jupiter Kenser.

The day concluded with books being exchanged for signatures. It was a bittersweet moment for co-presidents Emily Hoppe and Maisy Maclay, who are both set to graduate at the end of this year.  Together they hope to pass their knowledge and experience to next year’s editing team, ensuring that the magazine’s tradition will continue for years to come.

Advertisements
Local authors, Marketing, Reading, Self Publishing, Social Media, Writing

16 Marketing Strategies for Your Self-Published Book in 2019

We get asked often: “What’s the difference between book printers and book publishers?” Many people like to use these terms interchangeably. However, the printing of a book is merely one part of the complete process that is publishing.

One of the key differences is marketing. Book printers are responsible for the production of your physical book. However, in most cases the self-published author will be responsible for marketing his/her book once it has been printed.

With the amount of effort required to write a book, marketing is often an overlooked component of the self publishing process.

shutterstock_143889826

By 2019, several marketing strategies have emerged as clear winners for self-published authors. We’ve compiled some of the most successful strategies for indie authors and publishers.

1. Social Media Marketing (Paid & Unpaid)

The value of social media marketing cannot be understated. Your book should have its own page on all of the major social media channels, including Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Use your channels to keep followers updated with upcoming events and releases.

If you’re looking to expand your audience, consider running paid advertising campaigns. Set your ads to target readers with your local area using targeted interests.

2. Contests/Giveaways

Contests and giveaways are a great way to drum up excitement for your book release. Many authors choose to give away signed copies of their latest release. Host the giveaway on your social media pages or personal website.

3. Speaking Engagements

Create a list of all the local libraries and bookstores in your area. More than likely, these venues will be actively seeking speakers for weekly/monthly events. The stores benefit by showing that they support local writers, and you benefit by gaining a platform to promote and discuss your book.

dreamstime_m_5555015

4. Print & Flyer Advertising

While online marketing has become more crucial in recent years, print and flyer advertisements cannot be overlooked. Create posters for your upcoming book and hang them up at local coffee shops. Create postcards with your book’s artwork and send them to potential customers and local bookstores.

5. Writing Competitions

As a self-published author, you retain 100% of the rights to your book, meaning your free to submit your transcript to writing competitions. Winning an award is a great way to help your book to stand out from the crowd.

6. Newspapers & Press Releases

Your local newspaper likely has section promoting local art and culture. Learn to write press releases and send them to newspapers around your area. You may score an interview or a promotion for your upcoming book release.

7. Blogger & Influencer Endorsements

Word of mouth is still one of the most powerful marketing strategies in 2019. Find bloggers and book reviewers with large online followings. Snagging a positive review from a widely known influencer can help you reach audiences beyond your local area.

8. Personal Website

Resume websites are a popular trend in 2019. Create a resume website for your book! There are several free hosting services that can help you make this happen. You only need 1-3 webpages to describe your book, promote upcoming speaking engagements, and provide a link to where to purchase a  copy.

9. Newsletter Email List

You should be collecting names and emails at all your promotional events. Use this list to create a newsletter. That way you can send email blasts, alerting your list to your upcoming events, giveaways and future releases.

dreamstime_m_58266342

10. Guest Blogging

Larger blogs and review sites will sometimes invite guests to write one-off blogs for them. Contact blogs related to your book to see if they’d be open to you writing a guest blog for them. Be sure to include a short mention of the book towards the end of your article. It can’t hurt to ask!

11. Attend Conferences

As book sales continue to increase in 2019, so do book related events and conferences. Consider buying a booth at a local conference. Bring plenty copies of your book and sell signed editions from your booth.

12. Contact Bookstores & Libraries

Most of your local stores will have a section for local and independent authors. Contact your nearest bookstores and libraries to see if they’d be open to selling your book. Be prepared to provide a short summary, price and ISBN number.

13. Contact Publishers

Just because you’ve self-published your book doesn’t your manuscript can’t be picked up by a larger publisher. Submit your work for consideration. Self-publishing a book is also a great way to accrue reputation in the eyes of publishers for future releases.

14. Create a Business Card

Business cards are a tried and true method of promoting yourself. Design a business card that includes a description of your book, your contact information, and directions for where to purchase your book.

15. Get Your Books on Review Sites (Like Goodreads)

It’s not a mystery why so many books include reviews on their cover art. Reviews provide a backbone for your marketing campaign, especially if you can get a review from an established author. Sites like Goodreads make it easy to create a profile for your book for your to start soliciting reviews.

16. Make Connections!

Above all else, as a self-published author, you need to be comfortable with talking about and promoting yourself. The more people that you are able to connect with, the more likely one of those people will open a door for your book. Whether it be with bookstore owners, publishers or simply your readers, building lasting and personal connections may surprise you in ways you never thought possible.

Olympia High School Literary Journal
Community, Events, Local authors

OHS Unveils 2018 Literary Magazine: Petrichor

On Friday, June 1st, 2018, students gathered in the Olympia High School library for the unveiling of the school’s 2018 annual literary magazine, Petrichor. Streams of paper butterflies and balloons encircled the ceiling as students took turns in front of the room, reading excerpts from the magazine. Onlookers feasted on pizza and exchanged books for signatures.

The unveiling marked the year-long efforts of students and faculty in putting together the journal. Carolyn Gilman, an English teacher at OHS who spearheaded the project, praised her students for their countless hours of hard work. From editing to fundraising to design, students played a vital role in shaping all aspects of the book.

Olympia High School literary journal

Petrichor presents students with a unique opportunity to practice real-world trade skills, such as outreach, computer design and copy writing, from a classroom environment. The magazine derives it name from the Greek words petra, meaning stone, and īchōr, meaning the blood of the gods. Both the front and interior designs were created by students of the art department at OHS.

Olympia High School Literary JournalThe team behind Petrichor received a landslide of submissions, totaling more than 500 entries for inclusion in the journal. While many of the submissions came from members of OHS’ literary club, entries were accepted across the entirety of the student body.

In previous years, Carolyn Gilman and other faculty had served as judges for the entries. However, this year a small group of students volunteered for the daunting of picking the winners. After a lengthy and difficult review process, the team was able to pair down the submissions to just over 100 final selections.  Winners included poems, short stories, song lyrics and at least one rap song.

Gorham Printing was honored to be a recurring sponsor of the journal by donating half of the book’s printing cost. We take tremendous pride in supporting the literary efforts of our community, especially those among budding writers.

Free copies were distributed to all contributors. The remainder of the books went on sale to friends, family and anyone else interested in reading the works of these talented, young authors.

After a few more readings by the students, the event concluded with a master copy of the book being passed around for signatures from all of the journal’s contributors. The copy was presented to Carolyn Gilman as thanks for keeping this exemplary and valuable literary tradition alive at Olympia High School.

Community, Design, Local authors, Self Publishing

Gorham Printing Honors Our Veterans

Here at Gorham Printing, we take special note of Veteran’s Day. We have printed dozens of veterans’ memoirs over the course of our time in business, and we believe it is some of the most important work we do. We’d like to take a moment to showcase a few examples in addition to thanking all our veterans for their service to our country.IMG_0637

In 2014, retired Master Chief Petty Officer Peter Slempa brought his story to our shop with the help of local personal historian Julie MacDonald Zander. A Pennsylvania native, Pete Slempa served in the Navy aboard the USS Worcester CL-144 before qualifying for an underwater demolition team. He became a plank owner and first master chief of SEAL Team One, and served six tours in Vietnam. His memoir, Why Me, Lord? chronicles his life of service, including multiple near-death experiences. Earlier this year, we had the privilege of working with Officer Slempa again when he brought us his first novel, Ten Minus Nine Equals One Half.

Julie MacDonald Zander has had a hand in preserving the stories of dozens of veterans. She helped Lee Grimes tell the story of the founding of Lewis County’s Veterans Memorial Museum, now captured in the pages of the hardcover book, The Miracle Museum. Mr. Grimes conceived of the veterans museum in 1995 after a spiritual encounter, and realized his call to gather and preserve IMG_0638the stories of our veterans. The museum also serves as a community meeting space for local veterans to socialize, and seek support and healing. Copies of this book as well as Officer Slempa’s titles are available for sale here. You can learn more about the museum on their website, http://www.veteransmuseum.org/.

Gathering and preserving the stories of our local veterans makes up a significant part of the work done by Legacy Washington, a project run by the Secretary of State’s office just 30 minutes north of us in Olympia. Their big publication this fall was Korea 65: The Forgotten War Remembered. This 180-page 8×10” softcover commemorates the 65th anniversary of the “shaky armistice” that marked the end of the war on the Korean Peninsula that took the lives of 532 Washingtonians. John Hughes, Lori Larson, and several other members of the Secretary’s office have done and IMG_0639continue to do incredible work to make sure that our veteran’s stories are not forgotten. You can buy copies of Korea 65 as well as Washington Remembers World War II (2016) in Legacy Washington’s online bookstore.

We take a tremendous amount of pride in the work we do for veterans and the people who’ve committed themselves to preserving their legacies. We get to do this work year-round, and we always do it with gratitude, but today and tomorrow are special days set aside for deep reflection of and gratitude for the countrymen who have dedicated their lives to protecting our freedom.

From all the hearts at Gorham Printing, thank you.