Tag Archives: Books

Need to pay for your book project? Try crowdfunding!

We’ve seen many authors and artists come through our shop who have used a crowdfunding website to fund the cost of publishing their books. What is a crowdfunding website? It’s a website that exists as a platform to help people who have an idea, but need dollars to make the idea a reality. In our line of work, that idea is a book.

Listing your project on a crowdfunding website is also a great way to test the market’s interest in your book before it’s published. It will help you start thinking about the niche your book will fill. If you can successfully generate buzz for the concept of your book on a crowdfunding platform, there’s a good chance you’ll be able to enjoy some traction with your marketing efforts once the book is published.

The most commonly-used crowdfunding website is Kickstarter. Here is a link to their handbook to get you started, and a few tips to help along the way:

  • Backing others helps you learn the ropes and get a feel for the Kickstarter community.
  • Set up your payment options in advance so you are ready to accept funds on day one.
  • Be clear on discounts and perks – and get creative!
  • Aim high when setting your dollar amount, but not so high you can’t meet your goal and cash in.
  • Tell the story of your book, and consider making a video.
  • Answer all backer questions. They are supporting your efforts!
  • Use a simple analytics tracker to learn more about your readers.

Time to get inspired! Here are a few authors we know used Kickstarter to fund their book projects, then hired us to print them.

Bard_Hey Baby

 

Breena Bard, a Portland, Oregon-based cartoonist and graphic novelist released “Hey Baby,” a 6.5×8.5″ softcover, in summer 2016.

Breena’s Kickstarter

http://www.breenabard.com/

 

 

 

front-spine-back-covers-under_covers-outlined.eps

 

 

 

Margaret Davis, another Portland-based writer and book artist, funded “China Under the Covers” this past winter.

Margaret’s Kickstarter

http://chinaunderthecovers.com/

 

 

 

 

Adobe Photoshop PDF

 

 

Olympia-based fungi enthusiast Ellen King Rice funded her novel “The Evo Angel” in 2015 for publication in spring 2016.

Ellen’s Kickstarter

https://www.ellenkingrice.com/

 

 

 

 

Back in 2014, Peter Donahue funded a beautiful full-color, full-size landscape hardcover book complete with custom-printed end sheets and a matte-laminated dust jacket for the first volume of his popular “Rudek and the Bear” comic collection. As one of his Kickstarter pledge prizes, Peter drew any supporter who pledged $35 or more into the style of his characters and added it as a spread in the beginning of his book.

RUDEK AND THE BEAR VOL 1.indd

Peter’s Kickstarter

Peter’s ongoing web comic: http://zuzelandthefox.com/

Test the waters for your book project! Try crowdfunding!

Promoting Your Book at the Library

Are you looking for new ways to promote your book? Libraries are a great place to gain new readers and connect directly with your target audience.

Consider approaching your local library to set up a speaking engagement. If the library is interested in hosting your reading, they’ll likely put you on their event calendar so you can generate interest ahead of time. Ask if you can register the event on any other community event calendars, or with local special interest groups that might be interested in your topic.

The promotional tools an event like this can offer don’t stop there. The library might announce your reading on their social media pages, like Facebook and Twitter. Make sure to continue to share these event announcements, and encourage your friends and followers to share them too. The library might even have event posters printed, so ask if you can have a few to post around your community.ray_biko-frontcover-for-web

Many of our self-published authors give talks throughout their local library systems. In fact, we have a few regional authors with library events coming up!

The Naselle Timberland Library will host Laura Ray, author of Because of Biko, this Wednesday, March 1st at 6:00 PM. Laura will read from her book, which tells the story of her travels in Africa, and a discussion and book signing will follow.fateful-fourth-cover

On Saturday, March 4th, local author and historian Russell Holter will talk about his recently-published title, The Fateful Forth: The Story of America’s Worst Trolley Disaster at the Vernetta Smith Chehalis Timberland Library at 2:00 PM. A book sale and signing will follow. Russell’s book is part of our History Book Program, so you can order a copy online!

Author and Life Coach Anatha Attar will host a workshop title Tarot: A Path to Greater Personal Creativity at the Lacey Timberland Library on Saturday, March 4th at 3:00 PM. Anatha published her title Tarot and the Twelve Powers: A Journey for the Heart and Soul in summer 2016. You can learn more at her website.

Reach out to your local library system today to find out how you might be able to promote your book with their help!

An Evening with the Authors

Last Friday the Lewis County Historical Museum welcomed the public for its sixth annual Evening with the Authors. We had the privilege of attending this event and decked out our table to match the museum’s incredible Christmas Village and the rest of the festive decorations.

table-top

We took great pride in joining a good handful of our local authors at this event. While we love printing books for writers, families, and small presses all over the country, there is particular joy in supporting our local authors. This group of clients showcases the diversity of books we print. They represent novelists, historians, non-fiction and self-help writers.

our-authors

From left to right: Jan Pierson, author of the Ghostowners Series (calamityjan.com); Ellen King Rice with her novel, The Evo Angel, a mycological thriller set in the Pacific Northwest (ellenkingrice.com); Buddy Rose, author of Fire Mountains, a hiking guide to Washington’s three volcanoes; Margaret Chambers with her history of a rural Lewis County church, St. Urban’s Church: Early Years; Randall R. Booher and his personal development workbook, You Are the Issue, hot of the presses, along with his illustrator (and sister!), Leslie Gammelgaard; and Julie McDonald Zander with just two of her many local and personal history books, Winning a War and The Other Side of Banking (chaptersoflife.com).

We hope to see even more of our local authors here next year. Contact the museum for more information on how to participate.

Gorham Printing’s Mini-Me is Open

Not only is Gorham Printing, short-run book printer, fulfilling dreams for self-publishing authors around the country but they’ve become the first neighborhood Little Free Library location in Centralia. With a quiet grand opening on September 30, the miniature building/bookcase looks similar to the Gorham shop down to the same green metal roof.Book plate single

Have you heard of the Little Free Library program? This national, nonprofit organization began in 2009 with one little library in Wisconsin, with locations growing by the thousands in just five years. Gorham Printing’s official sign lists their library as charter No. 17,768. Facing the parking lot, it hangs from the wall with glass doors protecting the collection of used books. The initial selections have been donated by Gorham Printing staff.

Gorham Printing, relocated to the Port of Centralia in 2006, designs and prints books in all genres from memoirs to children’s picture books in both perfect bound or hard cover. Gorham prides itself on quality production and excellent customer service in the Pacific Northwest. Being a short-run book printer means your order can be as few as twenty-five copies for friends and family up to two thousand.

Gorham has now installed a Little Free Library for local readers as well. The Gorham library works on an honor system, people can borrow a book and bring it back or drop off a gently used book in exchange. The housed bookshelf next to the front door of Gorham Printing is open to the public 24/7, no permission needed when taking a book. Editions for all ages are available and the titles will rotate based on donated books.

More information about the concept and how to start a Little Free Library yourself is available on the littlefreelibrary.org website.

What Your Book Will Do For You as a Speaker?

Have you thought of becoming a speaker? What if you had a book you could sell at the back of the room after your talk? As a small business owner writing a book will increase your exposure across the country. Imagine a guidebook of generalities about your business, a handy volume of tips and tricks or an entertaining memoir of the CEO.

As a speaker, your topics may vary, yet your book subject matter should fill a need or void of information for your reader. Your book will help advance your ideas, maybe call attention to a new idea, or serve as a tangible representation of your experience. Your book will establish you as an authority on the subject.

Interestingly the words “author” and “authority” come from the same Latin word. To be an authority, you need to be an author. As an author, you are an authority. In a study cited by Forbes and BusinessWeek, 96% of surveyed business authors “realize a significant positive impact on their businesses from writing a book and would recommend the practice…”

A great example is national speaker Jen Mueller, CEO of Talk Sporty to Me, Seattle, Washington. Her book Game Time has gone through multiple printings, including custom orders from other venues to give away as gifts.

A published book under your arm as a speaker will increase the effect on your audience, elevate their respect for your knowledge whatever the topic. With the wonderful concept of short-run book printing, you can start with fifty to a hundred copies of your book to gauge reaction. Once your schedule starts filling up with speaking engagements, you order runs of books to be ready when you are. Are you ready?

Is short-run book printing right for you?

Is short-run book printing right for you?

Back of the Book Matter

“The End” or “El Fini” is not always the last page in a novel anymore. Granted it ends the storyline but you may find additional pages before the back cover. Such as About the Author information, maybe Acknowledgments even the first pages of the author’s next book. There could be an order page or advertising for other books the author has written. These pages are considered back matter.

People are accustomed to seeing six to twenty pages of back matter with a non-fiction book. This may include:

  • Appendix
  • EndnotesArtOfDevotionText
  • Glossary
  • Bibliography
  • About the Author
  • Index

A single book does not need all of these included. It will depend on you, as the author, to decide how much and what kinds of back matter to include.

Typically back matter is designed in a smaller font size than the main body of a book. This helps minimize the room the research matter takes up, however, these pages must be included in the total page count.

Why do some books have blank pages at the back of the book? When printing offset for a large production of books, the text is run in signatures. A signature can be a sheet containing sixteen or thirty-two pages of the book. If the end text runs out at page twelve of a sixteen-page signature, the last four pages will be blank.

Whether you’ve written a trilogy for young adults or a new revelation in building self-esteem, you’ll need to decide how much back matter your book needs for your audience.

What is Front Matter?

Open any book from your shelf, whether soft cover or hard cover to the first page. What do you see? A title page? A half title page? A page of endorsements for the author’s previous books? The first page could be any one of these. Now flip through the pages until you reach Chapter One. How many are there? Could be a minimum of four pages, could be quite extensive depending on the information the author has included. All pages in a book before Chapter One are considered front matter.

The cost of printing a book depends on three things: trim size, quantity of books ordered at one time and the total number of pages. Keep in mind the front matter of a book is included in the total number of pages. A minimum of four pages in the front matter would include: title page, copyright page, dedication with a blank page behind it. Typically these pages are numbered in Roman numerals beyond the dedication.

Half title page
Many novels start with a half title page where it’s a mainly blank page with only the title printed in small caps or at least smaller font than the title page. The back side is typically blank or includes a book card: a listing of previous works by the author or other titles in the series.

I thought a half title page allowed more room for the autograph. The author could personalize the book more extensively. What I’ve heard from bookstore owners, is an author’s signature should go on the title page itself making it more valuable.

Like Wearing Suspenders with a Belt
The number of front matter entries is up to you; however, too much is like doubling up protection for holding up your pants. Do you need to include a preface, introduction, foreword, list of illustrations and more in your book? No, and especially no if the book is fiction.

What’s the difference between a preface and an introduction? Both may be written by the author. A preface is an opportunity to state why the book came to be or what the author’s credentials are in writing this book. Sometimes various appreciations or gratitude’s are included. An introduction is written about the content of the book, maybe an overall view of the subject to introduce the reader to the subject. Typically the preface comes before the introduction.

Spell That Again? 
One of the most misspelled words an editor will find in a manuscript is the word foreword. Many writers mistakenly spell it forward, as in forward motion. An easy way to remember the correct spelling is thinking “before words” be-foreword-s. The foreword of a book is typically written by someone other than the author. This may be a testament from a professional source or celebrity in the genre.

Think of an engine on a train, this is the front matter. These pages of information bring the book forward, into being.