Community, Events, Local authors

Olympia High School Students Showcase Their Talent in 2019 Literary Journal

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Cover design for Sanctuary. Artwork by Zoe Wiley.

In the early hours of Friday morning, students crowded the Olympia High School library to share pizza and celebrate the unveiling of the 2019 literary magazine, Sanctuary. Featuring over 100 pieces of original prose, poetry and artwork, Sanctuary celebrates the talent and craftsmanship of Olympia’s young artists.

The unveiling concludes the year-long efforts of the school’s student-led literary club. To accomplish their task, club members were divided into groups, each charged with a different facet of the publishing process, including fundraising, layout and design. This year’s editors faced the particularly difficult task of narrowing down over 500 submissions.

Club presidents Emily Hoppe and Maisy Maclay kicked off the event by inviting students to read excerpts from their work. Readers took turns in front of the room, showcasing the magazine’s electric range of subject matters and styles.

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Student writer Haily O’Hara reads her submission to celebrate the unveiling.

“The name Sanctuary represents what we want the book to be for students,” said co-president Emily Hoppe. “We want the magazine to be a safe space for students to express themselves.”

The magazine not only serves as a creative outlet for students but also offers real-world industry experience. Several club members expressed hopes of applying the editing and design skills they learned while working on the magazine towards their portfolios and future careers.

“What makes this year’s magazine special is that I didn’t have to do anything,” said Carolyn Gilman, an OHS English teacher who serves as the magazine’s advisor. “The students really did everything, from editing to design to judging the submissions.”

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This year’s magazine was the first to feature full-color artwork. Artwork by Maggie Koontz.

Local book printer, Gorham Printing, helped sponsor the publication by donating 100 free copies towards the magazine’s 250 print run. As part of the publication process, students were invited to tour Gorham Printing’s print shop to learn more about the equipment and procedures used to print the magazine.

Free copies of Sanctuary were distributed to students who had their work featured in the magazine. Additional copies are set to go on sale for $10 at local bookstores and the school’s annual craft fair. Those interested in purchasing a copy can also do so via email by contacting: olyliterarymagazine@gmail.com.

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From left: Club advisor Carolyn Gilman. Editors in Chief Emily Hoppe and Maisie Maclay. Interior Designer Jupiter Kenser.

The day concluded with books being exchanged for signatures. It was a bittersweet moment for co-presidents Emily Hoppe and Maisy Maclay, who are both set to graduate at the end of this year.  Together they hope to pass their knowledge and experience to next year’s editing team, ensuring that the magazine’s tradition will continue for years to come.

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Olympia High School Literary Journal
Community, Events, Local authors

OHS Unveils 2018 Literary Magazine: Petrichor

On Friday, June 1st, 2018, students gathered in the Olympia High School library for the unveiling of the school’s 2018 annual literary magazine, Petrichor. Streams of paper butterflies and balloons encircled the ceiling as students took turns in front of the room, reading excerpts from the magazine. Onlookers feasted on pizza and exchanged books for signatures.

The unveiling marked the year-long efforts of students and faculty in putting together the journal. Carolyn Gilman, an English teacher at OHS who spearheaded the project, praised her students for their countless hours of hard work. From editing to fundraising to design, students played a vital role in shaping all aspects of the book.

Olympia High School literary journal

Petrichor presents students with a unique opportunity to practice real-world trade skills, such as outreach, computer design and copy writing, from a classroom environment. The magazine derives it name from the Greek words petra, meaning stone, and īchōr, meaning the blood of the gods. Both the front and interior designs were created by students of the art department at OHS.

Olympia High School Literary JournalThe team behind Petrichor received a landslide of submissions, totaling more than 500 entries for inclusion in the journal. While many of the submissions came from members of OHS’ literary club, entries were accepted across the entirety of the student body.

In previous years, Carolyn Gilman and other faculty had served as judges for the entries. However, this year a small group of students volunteered for the daunting of picking the winners. After a lengthy and difficult review process, the team was able to pair down the submissions to just over 100 final selections.  Winners included poems, short stories, song lyrics and at least one rap song.

Gorham Printing was honored to be a recurring sponsor of the journal by donating half of the book’s printing cost. We take tremendous pride in supporting the literary efforts of our community, especially those among budding writers.

Free copies were distributed to all contributors. The remainder of the books went on sale to friends, family and anyone else interested in reading the works of these talented, young authors.

After a few more readings by the students, the event concluded with a master copy of the book being passed around for signatures from all of the journal’s contributors. The copy was presented to Carolyn Gilman as thanks for keeping this exemplary and valuable literary tradition alive at Olympia High School.

Design, Self Publishing

Local Spotlight

Hayward_CoverOne of the more delightful aspects of being a short-run book printer in western Washington is the variety of local authors and celebrities who come through our doors. More recently we had the illustrious Allen Hayward, who according to his website worked “primarily with House Republicans as senior legal counsel … involved in many of the legal and political maneuvers of the last three decades.”

Not only did Mr. Hayward come in with an impressive manuscript under his arm, but brought along a unique entourage of his editors and cohorts, Derwyn “Chris” Christensen and Bill Engelhardt. When these three men walked through our doors, the energy level in the office definitely rose. Dynamic and enthusiastic, the trio worked with our art director, Kathy Campbell, for text layout and cover design comprising of thirty-four years working in Olympia, Washington.

The resulting tome, My Ride: The people, procedures and politics of lawmaking at our state capitol is an excellent example of our design and printing services. Mr. Hayward has taken an assertive approach in getting the word out about his new memoir, his website is simple yet informative with easy links to purchase a copy.

Congratulations, Mr. Hayward, here’s to successful sales.